Anne Slaughter

  • Selected Works

    Anne Slaughter. Departure, 2012.
    Acrylic and graphite on 100% rag paper mounted on museum board and wood, 41 x 26″. Sold

     

    Anne Slaughter. The Stranger, 2012.
    Acrylic and graphite on 100% rag paper, 41 x 26″.

     

    Anne Slaughter. The Thread Will Not Be Broken, 2012.
    Acrylic and graphite on 100% rag paper mounted on museum board and wood, 41 x 26″. Sold

     

    Anne Slaughter. Solace, 2013.
    Acrylic and charcoal on 100% rag paper mounted on museum board and wood, 41 x 26″. Sold.

     

    Anne Slaughter. Study for the Thread Will Not Be Broken, 2013-14.
    Acrylic on paper, 22.5 x 17.75″. Sold

     

    Anne Slaughter. How Do I Love Thee, 2011.
    Acrylic and graphite on 100% rag paper, 30 x 22″. Sold

     

    Anne Slaughter. At the Edge of the Night, 2013.
    Acrylic on 100% rag paper, 30 x 22″. Sold.

     

    Anne Slaughter. Encounter, 2014.
    Acrylic and graphite on 100% rag paper, 19 x 19″.

     

    Anne Slaughter. Study for Amicizia, 2014.
    Acrylic and graphite on hand made paper, 19 x 14″. Sold.

     

    Anne Slaughter. Released, 2014.
    Acrylic and gouache on 100% rag paper, 15 x11″.

  • Past Exhibitions

    Anne Slaughter
    Connections
    10 October – 16 November 2014
    Exhibition page >

    2006 Terra Incognita: Anne Slaughter, Forty Years, Les Yeux du Monde and Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA ( (Full-color catalogue available) 

    2002 9.11.01 Reflection

    2003 Wintergarden, Les Yeux du Monde, Charlottesville, VA

    1999 Moving into the Millenium: Darkness, Les Yeux du Monde, Charlottesville, VA

  • Biography

    Terra Incognita: Forty Years

    Anne Slaughter’s Retrospective exhibition “Terra Incognita: Forty Years of Anne Slaughter, 1966-2006” took place in the spring of 2006 concurrently at Second Street Gallery and Les Yeux du Monde. Few artists can say that they have made work for 40 years and experienced first hand World War II. Anne Slaughter claims both, and this 40-year retrospective and catalogue celebrated her compelling art and biography. Her work is familiar to Charlottesville, the place she has called home since 1957, and yet no major show had ever been mounted to document her art. This two-site exhibition sought to establish the breadth and evolution of this unique artist, presenting mixed media paintings, sculpture, works on paper, and prints made since 1966. Born in Brussels in 1934, Slaughter was six when the Germans marched into Belgium. Her life and travels around the world find expression in her landscapes, abstractions, and later installation and word pieces. Each body of work in her development to 2006 was represented, all touching upon themes constant in her art: the passage of time, the love of the natural world, and the desire to evoke profound feelings through surface materiality. The walls of bombed out buildings, seascapes of Belgium and landscapes of pastoral Virginia, and the earth in all its connotations – all these experiences inform Slaughter, whose tactile expressionism seeks to communicate “our need for silence and a sense of the infinite mystery that is still part of the human condition.” For a catalogue of this exhibition, contact us.

    CONNECTIONS

    Les Yeux du Monde presents the next phase in Anne Slaughter’s artistic evolution in the exhibition, “Anne Slaughter: Connections” 10 October – 16 November 2014. Slaughter’s statement below gives insight into these new haunting paintings that for the first time in her work include the human form.

    Artist’s Statement

    My passion has always been to renew my self in the natural world, to linger in the vastness of the land, the water and the sky. But also to explore the physical and emotional evidence of the passage of time on that world and on our human presence. I wonder at the beauty of the patina of earth and water on a smooth rock or a desert cliff, the bleached ruins of an ancient city, the layers of paint on a distressed wall or a weathered door, the faded traces of lost writings… The markings of time and the elements speak to me in their subtle colors and textures, and in the layering of our collective and individual memories, the continuity of our human endeavors and yet also of our temporality in a universe that transcends us. For many years, this has been the underpinning of my work as an artist. But in this new body of works, I have for the first time attempted to make the human figure the main focus of my paintings.

    At this stage of my life, I needed to address strong emotions that kept surfacing as ripples deep in an ocean become a continuous, powerful wave. The great loss of a childhood friend, a soulmate, was at its edge. But also surging and ebbing were the threads that weave the fabric of human friendship, joys and play, but also loneliness, pain and more and more, irretrievable losses.

    I realized, over many months of painting, that as I was layering, transforming and burnishing my materials into distressed surfaces and human figures, I was also continuing the theme of my former work by trying to express the passage of time on the layers of feelings and emotions in our lives. In my mind, I was closing a circle.

    Anne Slaughter
    October 7, 2014

  • Bibliography

    Selected Solo Exhibitions

    2006 Terra Incognita: Anne Slaughter, Forty Years,Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA ( Full-color catalogue available)
    2001 Lost Writings, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC
    1999 Fields of Memories,McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1998 Effacements: Fading Memories, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC
    1997 Paintings, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC (two-person)
    1996 Lost Messages, Bivins Gallery, Duke University, Durham, NC
    1995 The Memory of Walls, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC
    1994 Violence: The Aftermath (installation), Daryl Reich Rubenstein Art Gallery, Sidwell Friends School, Washington, DC
    1993 Violence: The Aftermath, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    Paintings, Miroir d’Encre, Brussels, Belgium
    White Patterns, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1992 Masada Series,Piedmont Virginia Community College, Charlottesville, VA
    1991 Vestiges, ARC Gallery, Chicago, IL
    From the Sahara, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1990 Vestiges, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1987 Ancient Landscapes, Gallery IV, Alexandria, VA
    1986 Earth Fragments, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1985 Collages, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1984 Arid Landscapes, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1983 Sere Landscapes, Emerson Gallery, McLean, VA
    New Works, Galerie l’Angle Aigu, Brussels, Belgium
    1980 Landscapes and Collages, Galerie l’Angle Aigu, Brussels, Belgium
    1979 Recent Works, Downtown Library Gallery, Roanoke, VA
    Invitational, Babcock Gallery, Sweet Briar College, Lynchburg, VA
    1978 Landscapes,McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    1976 Landscapes,McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA

    Selected Group Exhibitions

    2006 Alumni Show, McGuffey Art Center, Charlottesville, VA
    WPA/Corcoran Select, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (co-curator: Sally Troyer)
    2005 Faces of the Fallen, National Memorial for Women in the Military, Arlington, VA
    WPA/Corcoran Select, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
    The Family of Law, University of Virginia Law Library, Charlottesville, VA
    2003 30 Years: Three Decades of New Art at Second Street Gallery, Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA
    Summer Show, Troyer Art Gallery, Washington, DC
    2002 9.11.01 Reflection, part II, Fayerweather Gallery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
    Wintergarden, Les Yeux du Monde, Charlottesville, VA
    Fold Here: 3D Paper Sculptures, Ellipse Art Center, Arlington, VA
    2001 Through the Looking Glass: Celebrating the Octagon’s Bicentennial, The Octagon, Washington, DC (Curator: Vivienne Lassman)
    10+10 American and Italian Artists: The Sea, The Color of Wine, Scudere Medicee, Poggio a Caiano, Italy
    2000 Moving into the Millenium: Darkness, Les Yeuxdu Monde, Charlottesville, VA
    Virginia Connections, 1708 Gallery, Richmond, VA
    1999 University of Virginia Law Library, Charlottesville, VA
    Myth, Memory and Imagination: Selections from the Collection of Julia J. Norrell, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
    Get Surreal: Reviving the Exquisite Corpse, Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA
    1997 Juried Show, 1708 Gallery, Richmond, VA (Juror: Donald Kuspit)
    1995 Totems & Icons, Crestar Bank, Richmond, VA (Curator: Georgia Coopersmith)
    1994 Artemis XVII (traveling exhibition), Washington & Lee University, Lexington, VA
    Artemis XVII (traveling exhibition), Roanoke College, Salem, VA
    Winners of Juried Exhibition 1993, Greater Reston Art Center, Reston, VA
    Commissions, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC
    1993 Ephemerides, Miroir d’Encre Art Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
    American Art Alumni Collection, McCormick Museum, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (Juror: Thomas Hoving)
    Explorations, Troyer Fitzpatrick Lassman Gallery, Washington, DC
    Ecritures, Miroir d’Encre Art Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
    1992 Peninsula Fine Arts Center Juried Exhibition,Peninsula Fine Arts Center, Newport News, VA (Juror: Neal Benezra)
    1991 Ephemerides, Miroir d’Encre Art Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
    Select, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA (Juror: Julia Boyd)

    Selected Corporate and Public Collections

    University of Virginia Art Museum
    Art Museum of Western Virginia
    CSX Corporation
    Suez Energy International
    Trammel Crowe Corporation
    University of Virginia Hospital
    Shenandoah Life Insurance Co.
    University of Virginia Law School
    McGuire Woods
    SunTrust Bank
    Hunton & Williams
    Central Fidelity Bank-Virginia Collection
    Akin & Gump
    Bank of Virginia
    Dickstein Shapiro & Morin
    The World Bank
    Julia Norrell Collection

    Selected Bibliography

    2006 Stoddard, Leah. “Terra Incognita and the Intuitive Archeologist” Catalogue Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years 2006)
    Troyer, Sally, “Anne Slaughter : Layers of Emotion&rdquo Catalogue : Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years (2006)
    Lassman, Vivienne. “Nature Laid Bare: Anne Slaughter’s Artistic Journey&rdquo Catalogue : Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years (2006)
    Latter, Ruth. “Memories of War Reflect on Canvas&rdquo Daily Progress (March 16, 2006): D1
    Maurer, David. “Solid Perfection” Daily Progress (April 9, 2006): C1
    Laura, Parsons. “Recollection: Slaughter’s Sentimental Nature” The Hook (April 13, 2006): 44
    Michael, Alexander. “Terra Incognita 40 Years of Anne Slaughter” Albemarle Magazine (April/May 2006): 20
    2005 “Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC: Michael Fitts and Anne Slaughter, March 2005,” Albemarle Magazine (February/March 2005): 24.
    2001 O’Sullivan, Michael. “A Tale of Two Houses,” The Washington Post Weekend (February 9, 2001): 55.
    2000 Goodwin, Lauren. “Anne Slaughter: A True World Artist,” Southern Accents (March/April 2000). www.southernaccents.com/art/slaughter/asp
    Kramer, Jennifer. “Memories Redux,” Southern Accents (March/April 2000): 94-97.
    1999 Latter, Ruth. “Colorful Contemporary Figures,” The Daily Progress (July 22, 1999): D1.
    1998 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Reflections on Memory,” The Washington Post (October 24, 1998).
    Wall, Donna Dorian. “Paper Chase,” Southern Accents (May/June 1998): 122.
    1997 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Bronze and Ochre,” The Washington Post (February 1, 1997): C2.
    Bates, Anne. “Must Sees,” Ken ODA’s Art Newsletter (February 1997): 19.
    1995 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Memories That Walls Can Reveal,” The Washington Post (December 2, 1995): C2.
    Rotner, Sheilah. “Must Sees,” Ken ODA’s Art Newsletter (December 1995): 18.
    1994 Atkinson, Linda. Artemis XVII,Roanoke, VA (March 1994).
    Weinstein, Ann. “Art inView,” The Roanoke Times (February 1994): 11.
    1993 Purvis, Mike. “Art Reviews,” Washington Review (October/November 1993): 17.
    Fleming, Lee. “When the Spirit is Thrilling,” The Washington Post (July 10, 1993): D2.
    Latter, Ruth. “Slaughter’s ‘Violence’ Leaves Room for Healing,” The Daily Progress (June 17, 1993): D1.
    Margulies, Stephen.“Review: Exhibition,” The Daily Progress (June 10, 1993).
    O’Sullivan, Constance Lord. Environmental: Peninsula Fine Arts Center Juried Exhibition, Newport News: Peninsula Fine Arts Center, 1993. [exhibition catalogue]
    1992 Latter, Ruth. “McGuffey,” The Daily Progress (December 1992): D4.
    Mook, Bea. “Ancient Legacy Flowers at PVCC,” The Daily Progress (September 14, 1992): 2.
    O’Sullivan, Constance Lord. Peninsula Fine Arts Center Juried Exhibition, Newport News: Peninsula Fine Arts Center, 1992. [exhibition catalogue]
    1990 Latter, Ruth. “Styles Vary, but Artists Mirror Human Experience,” The Daily Progress (April 14, 1990): 3.
    Latter, Ruth. “Slaughter Exhibit Rich, Inspirational,” The Daily Progress (May 1988).
    Clark, William. The William and Mary Review, vol. 26, no. 1, 1988.
    1987 Latter, Ruth. “Landscapes Reshaped by Artist,” The Daily Progress (September 27, 1987).
    1986 “McGuffey Exhibit,” The Daily Progress (November 23, 1986): E4.
    Latter, Ruth. “Emotions Overflow Downtown,” The Daily Progress (April 14, 1985): D3.
    1984 “Art Center to Display Landscapes,” The Daily Progress (October 6, 1984): 3.
    Latter, Ruth. “Decorative Banners Again a Popular Art Form,” The Daily Progress (July 1, 1984): F6.
    Ripe, Peter. 1984 Roanoke Biennial, Roanoke: Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts, 1984. [exhibition catalogue]
    1983 “Galerie l’Angle Aigu Review,” Le Soir (October 1983).
    1982 Latter, Ruth. “Art Exudes Calm Atmosphere,” The Daily Progress (May 16, 1982).
    1979 “Art for All,” Roanoke Times and World-News (February 4, 1979).
    1978 “McGuffey Exhibit,” The Daily Progress (June 25, 1978).
    1976 Latter, Ruth. “‘Good Views’ Interest Artists,” The Daily Progress (June 13, 1976): E11.
    1975 Hathaway, Walter. Roanoke Fine Arts Center Juried Artists Exhibition 1975, Roanoke: Roanoke Fine Arts Center, 1975. [exhibition catalogue]

  • Articles & Reviews

    2006 Stoddard, Leah. “Terra Incognita and the Intuitive Archeologist” Catalogue Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years 2006)
    Troyer, Sally, “Anne Slaughter : Layers of Emotion&rdquo Catalogue : Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years (2006)
    Lassman, Vivienne. “Nature Laid Bare: Anne Slaughter’s Artistic Journey&rdquo Catalogue : Terra Incognita – Anne Slaughter 40 Years (2006)
    Latter, Ruth. “Memories of War Reflect on Canvas&rdquo Daily Progress (March 16, 2006): D1
    Maurer, David. “Solid Perfection” Daily Progress (April 9, 2006): C1
    Laura, Parsons. “Recollection: Slaughter’s Sentimental Nature” The Hook (April 13, 2006): 44
    Michael, Alexander. “Terra Incognita 40 Years of Anne Slaughter” Albemarle Magazine (April/May 2006): 20
    2005 “Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC: Michael Fitts and Anne Slaughter, March 2005,” Albemarle Magazine (February/March 2005): 24.
    2001 O’Sullivan, Michael. “A Tale of Two Houses,” The Washington Post Weekend (February 9, 2001): 55.
    2000 Goodwin, Lauren. “Anne Slaughter: A True World Artist,” Southern Accents (March/April 2000). www.southernaccents.com/art/slaughter/asp
    Kramer, Jennifer. “Memories Redux,” Southern Accents (March/April 2000): 94-97.
    1999 Latter, Ruth. “Colorful Contemporary Figures,” The Daily Progress (July 22, 1999): D1.
    1998 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Reflections on Memory,” The Washington Post (October 24, 1998).
    Wall, Donna Dorian. “Paper Chase,” Southern Accents (May/June 1998): 122.
    1997 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Bronze and Ochre,” The Washington Post (February 1, 1997): C2.
    Bates, Anne. “Must Sees,” Ken ODA’s Art Newsletter (February 1997): 19.
    1995 Protzman, Ferdinand. “Memories That Walls Can Reveal,” The Washington Post (December 2, 1995): C2.
    Rotner, Sheilah. “Must Sees,” Ken ODA’s Art Newsletter (December 1995): 18.
    1994 Atkinson, Linda. Artemis XVII,Roanoke, VA (March 1994).
    Weinstein, Ann. “Art inView,” The Roanoke Times (February 1994): 11.
    1993 Purvis, Mike. “Art Reviews,” Washington Review (October/November 1993): 17.
    Fleming, Lee. “When the Spirit is Thrilling,” The Washington Post (July 10, 1993): D2.
    Latter, Ruth. “Slaughter’s ‘Violence’ Leaves Room for Healing,” The Daily Progress (June 17, 1993): D1.
    Margulies, Stephen.“Review: Exhibition,” The Daily Progress (June 10, 1993).
    O’Sullivan, Constance Lord. Environmental: Peninsula Fine Arts Center Juried Exhibition, Newport News: Peninsula Fine Arts Center, 1993. [exhibition catalogue]
    1992 Latter, Ruth. “McGuffey,” The Daily Progress (December 1992): D4.
    Mook, Bea. “Ancient Legacy Flowers at PVCC,” The Daily Progress (September 14, 1992): 2.
    O’Sullivan, Constance Lord. Peninsula Fine Arts Center Juried Exhibition, Newport News: Peninsula Fine Arts Center, 1992. [exhibition catalogue]
    1990 Latter, Ruth. “Styles Vary, but Artists Mirror Human Experience,” The Daily Progress (April 14, 1990): 3.
    Latter, Ruth. “Slaughter Exhibit Rich, Inspirational,” The Daily Progress (May 1988).
    Clark, William. The William and Mary Review, vol. 26, no. 1, 1988.
    1987 Latter, Ruth. “Landscapes Reshaped by Artist,” The Daily Progress (September 27, 1987).
    1986 “McGuffey Exhibit,” The Daily Progress (November 23, 1986): E4.
    Latter, Ruth. “Emotions Overflow Downtown,” The Daily Progress (April 14, 1985): D3.
    1984 “Art Center to Display Landscapes,” The Daily Progress (October 6, 1984): 3.
    Latter, Ruth. “Decorative Banners Again a Popular Art Form,” The Daily Progress (July 1, 1984): F6.
    Ripe, Peter. 1984 Roanoke Biennial, Roanoke: Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts, 1984. [exhibition catalogue]
    1983 “Galerie l’Angle Aigu Review,” Le Soir (October 1983).
    1982 Latter, Ruth. “Art Exudes Calm Atmosphere,” The Daily Progress (May 16, 1982).
    1979 “Art for All,” Roanoke Times and World-News (February 4, 1979).
    1978 “McGuffey Exhibit,” The Daily Progress (June 25, 1978).
    1976 Latter, Ruth. “‘Good Views’ Interest Artists,” The Daily Progress (June 13, 1976): E11.
    1975 Hathaway, Walter. Roanoke Fine Arts Center Juried Artists Exhibition 1975, Roanoke: Roanoke Fine Arts Center, 1975. [exhibition catalogue]

     

    Reviews and Essays

    …One of the things that has impressed curator Leah Stoddard the most about Slaughter’s work is her willingness to take new artistic paths that lead away from the familiar…“what greatly impresses me about Anne Slaughter and her work is her willingness to take chances.” Stoddard said. “It’s very hard I think as an artist to experiment and try new directions. “Her work is interesting to me because it has a real European approach. That is to say, when she tries something new, she does not leave what she was doing in the past behind. It’s always continuing these themes. It’s a very sophisticated approach. She is not afraid to try something new, revisit something she has done before or even try new materials.”…
    …Lyn Bolen Warren, owner and director of Les Yeux du Monde gallery, has been an admirer of Slaughter’s work since first encountering it in the 1980s.
    “Although she has followed an inner voice throughout her artistic career, using it to respond to events and emotions in her own life, the works reverberate in other’s lives because they evoke human emotions, losses and memories that transcend the particular and are more about the history of our own time.”
    “Her work through the years reveals a continuous and authentic artistic quest and accomplishment.”
    David A. Maurer – Daily Progress, Charlottesville VA 2006

     

    Slaughter is a contemplative artist. Coming as she does from war-torn Europe to a quiet university town, she is a close observer of two worlds, and her duality of vision is apparent in her frequent overlaying of one color or texture upon another. Her rich layering is too grand and too dynamic to be simply identified as collage. The lead, copper foil or what looks like bandaged gauze as well as bits of painted canvas and paper evoke strength and force of serious thought. These collaged elements become potent symbols. But the most prevalent and symbolic of the elements are her bits and pieces of handwritten texts.
    … Slaughter’s work possesses an amazing sense of beauty, not just the beauty of a message of hope, but the physical beauty of harmony and elegance. However even in her most beautiful and elegiac paintings there are still signs
    of tearing and forcing elements into a new whole, one that is elegant and emotionally provocative.
    Sally Troyer – independent curator – catalogue essay 2006

     

    …People are absent in human form in Anne Slaughter’s work, but they are present in the marks they have left, physically, intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. The transformation of the remainders of doors or walls into expressive paintings infused with glowing colors and rich textures pulsate with commonalities of human memories…The artist infuses her paintings with temporality while struggling for power and mystery…
    …Slaughter seeks an understanding of our universe. Passionate about art and its relevance to nature and human experience, she embraces her love of beauty and seeks to convey it profoundly. The essence of Slaughter’s struggle is contained in her White Paintings. This is about silence, about loss. Stillness, the absence of energy as it fades and finally forgetting. White to the artist is the color of light and death. It is the purity of a bleached bone in the desert or unsoiled snow. It is an essential part of her vocabulary and she views it as having many colors to express the distillation of silence…
    Vivienne Lassman – independent curator- catalogue essay 2006

     

    …The strong textures and surfaces in the current exhibition reflect her previous work. The paintings and the sole sculpture are done in mixed media, with acrylic paint, lead foil…Some of the canvases are slashed, their gashes filled with small cloth or paper bundles, like hidden treasures.
    It is that sense of mystery, the feeling of secrets revealed but inexplicable that give Slaughter’s work their emotional power. We wonder who lived in these walls, although the answer is obvious, we all do….
    Memory of Walls – Ferdinand Protzman, Washington Post 1995

     

    Troyer, Fitzpatrick and Lassman Gallery is showing a fine group of paintings by Anne Slaughter from her “Memory” series. The central theme running through all Slaughter’s works in recent years is the erosive power of time, how it inexorably wears down the natural world and renders people physically, mentally and emotionally indistinct….
    …There are many lovely paintings –subtle, lyrical, engaging—in the show. But the single most powerful piece is a sculptural installation titled “Portal of Memories #1”. It consists of am arched doorway…From the apex of the doorway Slaughter has hung a bunch of letters in her native French…the letters function like bits of sand passing through an hour glass. Their significance and context are steadily eroding….
    There is something overwhelmingly honest in the sculptural installation and a terrible simple beauty.
    Reflections on Memory – Ferdinand Protzman, Washington Post 1998

     

    The walls reference the residue of war destroyed houses from the artist’s childhood memories of her native Belgium. However, the pieces in this show achieve a universality that transcends specific time and place. The layering of materials…beautifully captures the artist’s concept of the layering of memories and surfaces. She masterfully integrates the components of her work so that color, texture, and composition achieve a flawless interaction…
    Memory of Walls – Koan, “must see” Sheilah Rotner 1998

    Fading messages are given concrete form in Anne Slaughter’s mixed media compositions. Bundled together like precious artifacts from the distant past, or scratched on a mesh-covered ‘wall”, they speak of antiquity, love, war, happiness and sorrow. In her memorable compositions, Slaughter keeps the past alive.
    Ruth Latter, Daily Progress, Charlottesville, VA 1999