Anne Chesnut

  • Selected Works

    Ginny and Her Shadow
    from the series Canes Venatici, 2013
    Digital print
    21.5 x 19.25″

    Car Caroli
    from the series Canes Venatici, 2013
    Digital print
    21.5 x 19.25″

    Shoo Fly and Southern Fly, 2012
    Digital print
    12 x 19″

    Sampler: Winter Blackwork 1, 2013
    4 digital prints hand-sewn together
    24 x 24″

     

  • Previous Exhbitions
  • Statement
  • Biography

    After receiving her MFA from Yale University, Anne Chesnut continued her art education in New York at the Studio School, the National Academy of Design, and as a member of Robert Blackburn’s Printmaking Workshop. She has exhibited throughout the country in many group and solo shows and been the subject of catalogues and reviews , most recently a comprehensive exhibition catalogue available through Les Yeux du Monde and a review in the Washington Post. She is not only an outstanding visual artist and printmaker, with work in prominent private and public collections from Capital One to the Smithsonian Institution and Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center, she is just as notable for her graphic design. Her clients for design have included universities, museums,and companies from Oracle to JP Morgan and PBS. Drawing—the basis of other art forms—is central to Chesnut’s art because of it ability to illuminate simple, basic truths. Lithography naturally followed, since it is most closely linked to drawing. Her comprehensive knowledge of computer imagery and her training in printmaking have merged into complex digital prints. In her latest prints, Chesnut combines and manipulates disparate images taken from drawings, photographs, and her traditional prints with graphic elements she has created digitally. The subjects of these aggregated images range from the macrocosm to the microcosm; constellations, birds, seashells, flowers, letters and numbers provide the starting point for creating conceptually arresting and visually rich works. Some of these prints take the form of “samplers” and whimsical commentary “quilts” to which Chesnut adds her own stitching on them, or stitching several prints together. These “stitches” remind the viewer of the artist’s “handiwork”, echo the interwoven dialogue between art and facts in each piece, and thus parallel the way Chesnut digitally stitches ideas and images together to make a whole new print form.